News

David Voss at APS Physics writes: ''Nonlocality—the entanglement of one object with another at a distance—is a powerful way to achieve quantum information processing. However, quantum mechanics is tethered by a “no-signaling” principle, that is, these correlations cannot be used to transmit information arbitrarily quickly from one point to another.

US NSF Travel Grant Program for Nordita/Mittag-Leffler
Conference on Quantum Information Theory 4-8 Oct. 2010

This program will provide funds to support travel and lodging for US scientists to participate in the International Conference on Quantum Information Theory to be held in Stockholm Sweden during 4-8 October 2010. Information on the conference is available at http://agenda.albanova.se/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=1440

<p>

Building on the quantumCity initiative, the eThekwini Municipality and the Centre for Quantum Technology, a research group of the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), has moved to secure the network linking the Moses Mabhida Stadium and the Joint Operation Centre in the city of Durban during the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

The small-world property (that everyone has a few-step connection to celebrities), for instance, is a prominent result derived in this field. A group of scientists around Professor Cirac, Director at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching near Munich) and Leader of the Theory Division, has now introduced complex networks in the microscopic, so called, quantum regime (Nature Physics, Advanced Online Publication, DOI:10.1038/NPHYS1665).

Physicists in Israel are the first to entangle five photons in a NOON state – the superposition of two extreme quantum states. Unlike previous schemes for creating such states, the researchers claim that their new technique can entangle an arbitrarily large number of photons – so called “high-NOON states”. This could be good news for those developing quantum metrology techniques because high-NOON states could be used to improve the precision of a range of different measurements.

Researchers from two National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers at Princeton University and the University of California, Santa Barbara made a significant breakthrough in the worldwide pursuit of quantum computing. They engineered a method to control the spin of a single electron within a magnetic field without disturbing other nearby electrons.

Physicists at [http://jila.colorado.edu/ JILA] have for the first time observed chemical reactions near absolute zero, demonstrating that chemistry is possible at ultralow temperatures and that reaction rates can be controlled using quantum mechanics, the peculiar rules of submicroscopic physics.

This is a reminder that the deadline of Wed., 20 Jan. for applications for POSTDOCS at Mittag-Leffler for the Quantum Information program is very close.

From the blog: [...] Today, at the Neural Information Processing Systems conference (NIPS 2009), we show the progress we have made. We demonstrate a detector that has learned to spot cars by looking at example pictures. It was trained with adiabatic quantum optimization using a D-Wave C4 Chimera chip. There are still many open questions but in our experiments we observed that this detector performs better than those we had trained using classical solvers running on the computers we have in our data centers today.