News

Physicists at [http://jila.colorado.edu/ JILA] have for the first time observed chemical reactions near absolute zero, demonstrating that chemistry is possible at ultralow temperatures and that reaction rates can be controlled using quantum mechanics, the peculiar rules of submicroscopic physics.

This is a reminder that the deadline of Wed., 20 Jan. for applications for POSTDOCS at Mittag-Leffler for the Quantum Information program is very close.

From the blog: [...] Today, at the Neural Information Processing Systems conference (NIPS 2009), we show the progress we have made. We demonstrate a detector that has learned to spot cars by looking at example pictures. It was trained with adiabatic quantum optimization using a D-Wave C4 Chimera chip. There are still many open questions but in our experiments we observed that this detector performs better than those we had trained using classical solvers running on the computers we have in our data centers today.

According to NIST News Page, Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated the first “universal” programmable quantum information processor able to run any program allowed by quantum mechanics—the rules governing the submicroscopic world—using two quantum bits (qubits) of information. The processor could be a module in a future quantum computer, which theoretically could solve some important problems that are intractable today.

Levitin and Toffoli have published a paper that is best summed up by the final sentence of the abstract: "These results establish the fundamental quantum limit on the rate of operation of any information-processing system". News article here and paper on arXiv here

In a paper appearing today in Physical Review Letters, however, MIT researchers present a new algorithm that could bring the same type of efficiency to systems of linear equations — whose solution is crucial to image processing, video processing, signal processing, robot control, weather modeling, genetic analysis and population analysis, to name just a few applications. Read the original paper at ArXiv.

The document which serves as the basis for the consultation is the RESEARCH AGENDA for 2011-2013 drafted by the QUROPE governing board. The document gives a motivation for the field, presents the challenges, explains the impact, lists the disciplines involved and describes the level of maturity of the field as well as the stakeholders.

Hamish Johnston speculates about possible QI Nobel laureates.

According to PhysicsWorld researchers from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil and Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen, Germany have added another capability to the quantum computing toolkit by being the first to show that light beams of three different wavelengths can be entangled. This achievement could provide a way to create three-way optical communication links between elements of a quantum computer. This result was published in the recent issue of Science magazine.

Quantum cryptography is a promising new way to send encrypted information. This new technology does suffer from some drawbacks. One of the toughest problems is the range that information can be sent is limited to around 50-100 km. Advancements have been underway. The most promising advancement is being working on by a team based out of the Australian National University. They found a way to store and manipulate photons to be used as a memory device.