News

Please join our [https://www.facebook.com/pages/Relativistic-Quantum-Information/20797355... Relativistic Quantum Information Facebook page] and/or follow us on Twitter @RelQuantInfo to get news on what is happening in this exciting new research field.

Best,
Ivette Fuentes
University of Nottingham

Double slit experiments play a key role in Quantum Theory in distinct particle and
wave interactions according to Feynman. In this paper, double path models
together with variant logic principles are applied to establish a simulation system
enabling the exhaustive testing of given targets. Using Einstein quanta interaction,
different quaternion measures are investigated. Under conditions of Symmetry /
Anti-symmetry and Synchronous / Asynchronous interaction, eight groups of

Adrian Kent will give a journal club on Google Plus about his paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1101.4620 on Tuesday the 23rd, 14:00 UK time! This will be a first trial for a potential series of journal clubs
done by g+ hangouts (group video chat). As they are currently restricted to 10 members it will happen on a first come, first served basis.

If you have technical questions please let me know, and make sure to connect to me on Google+.
Hope to see you there! Daniel

We are happy to announce that, by decision of the QUIE2T Advisory Board of Experts and upon approval by the QUIE2T Coordination Steering committee, the 2011 European Quantum Information Young Investigator Award has been awarded jointly to:

We are very sad to inform the quantum community that professor Roman Stanisław Ingarden, famous Polish physicist, passed away on the 12th of July 2011. Before his death he worked as professor emeritus at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. His scientific achievements have been recognised worldwide. In 1976 he published the paper 'Quantum Information Theory' which is, most probably, the first documented case of using the term 'quantum information theory'.

Physicists have always thought quantum computing is hard because quantum states are incredibly fragile. But could noise and messiness actually help things along?

Carbon as a razor-thin transparent foil is one of the innovations presented by the "Munich-Centre of Advanced Photonics" (MAP) at the "LASER – World of Photonics" on May 23-26 in Munich. High-power lasers knock out pulsed ion beams out of these foils, which will be used as a low-cost and gentle alternative for cancer therapy in a few years. At the joint booth of the Bavarian Universities (B2.407) MAP and the future "Centre for Advanced Laser Applications" (CALA) present how cancer diagnostics and therapy benefit from the new lasers.

This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to coherent states. The motivation behind this special issue is to gather in a single comprehensive volume the main aspects (past and present), latest developments, different viewpoints and directions being followed in this multidisciplinary field. Given the impressive development of the field in the past two decades, the topicality of such a volume can hardly be overemphasized.

Hamish Johnston writes at PhysicsWorld: ''A small firm based in Canada that aims to build a commercially viable quantum computer has shown that an important part of its technology works. D-Wave Systems, which was spun-out of the University of British Columbia in 1999, has shown that a technique called quantum annealing can be used to make eight coupled quantum bits – or qubits – find their ground state.

Professor Immanuel Bloch, Director at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and Professor for experimental physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, has been elected by the EPS for the “2011 Prize for Fundamental Aspects of Quantum Electronics and Optics”. The award is given to him for his “pioneering work on exploring quantum many-body systems using ultracold quantum gases for quantum simulation and quantum information applications.”
<!--break-->