News

Taking a step toward the realization of futuristic quantum technologies, a team of physicists from China and Germany has demonstrated a key element – an entangling gate – of a quantum teleportation scheme proposed more than 10 years ago. The entangling gate serves as a fundamental building block for applications such as long-distance quantum communication and practical quantum computers.

It was agreed by many that the existence of a (moderated) quantum foundations mailing list, with a wide scope and involving the broad international community, was long overdue. Now it exists, with currently about 500 subscribers. To subscribe, send a blank email to quantum-foundations-subscribe@maillist.ox.ac.uk To make a post, send an email to quantum-foundations@maillist.ox.ac.uk

PicoQuant GmbH and the Department of Physics - Nanooptics of Humboldt University have started a high bit rate quantum random number generator service delivering truly random numbers over the internet. Using the service is free of charge but requires registration.

Michael Banks writes at Physics World: ''The US is no longer a "colossus of science" according to a new report looking into the country’s scientific output. Written by information-services provider Thomson Reuters, it says that although the US still holds a "commanding" lead in terms of its research impact, its forerunner status is being eroded. The report blames this on a rapid rise in scientific publishing from countries in Asia and Europe.''
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Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng at IDW writes: ''The ability to control the propagation of light is at the technological heart of today’s telecommunication society. Researchers in the Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurement led by Prof. Tobias J. Kippenberg (now EPFL) have discovered a novel principle to accomplish this, which is based on the interaction of light (photons) with mechanical vibrations (phonons).

Quantum communication networks are high on Europe's agenda, with particular focus being given to quantum memory or information storage. Meeting the challenge head on to make such information accessible to users is a team of scientists from Denmark who used two 'entangled' light beams to store quantum information. The research study, supported by the EU with a combined funding of almost EUR 16 million, is presented in the journal Nature Physics.

ID Quantique will be organizing the third Winter School on Practical Quantum Cryptography in January 2011 in the Swiss Alps. The goal of this program is to introduce, to a general audience of physicists and computer scientists with little or no background in practical quantum cryptography, this exciting topic in a relaxed and stimulating atmosphere. The program also includes hands-on tutorials, as well key note lectures by renowned researchers Nicolas Gisin (University of Geneva), Renato Renner (ETH Zurich) and Vadim Makarov (Norwegian University of Science and Technology).

Quantiki needs your contribution and is going to appreciate it! If you feel you can provide a significant input for our Wiki project, i.e. create a new, fascinating article or expand an existing one to make it more comprehensive and educational, this is the best moment to do so. Your knowledge will certainly increase the satisfaction of our visitors and contributing to our project will definitely bring you immense satisfaction and eternal gratitude of quantum community ;)

The entanglement of quantum objects can take surprising forms. Quantum physicists at the University of Innsbruck have investigated several flavors of entanglement in four trapped ions and report their results in the journal Nature Physics. Their study promotes further developments towards quantum computing and a deeper understanding of the foundations of quantum mechanics.<!--eec6d63ab9254743b4cb276771aa8eaa-->
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<p>Hamish Johnston at PhysicsWorld writes: ''A new optical chip that allows pairs of photons to take a quantum walk has been unveiled by an international team of physicists. The tiny device contains an array of 21 coupled optical waveguides and could provide greater insight into quantum interference. Further in the future, the technology could find use in quantum computers.''</p>
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