Quantum cryptography is a promising new way to send encrypted information. This new technology does suffer from some drawbacks. One of the toughest problems is the range that information can be sent is limited to around 50-100 km. Advancements have been underway. The most promising advancement is being working on by a team based out of the Australian National University. They found a way to store and manipulate photons to be used as a memory device.

<p>According to Physics World researchers at the University of Bristol, UK have made a prototype optical quantum computer chip and used it to perform a mathematical calculation. The device consists of tiny silica waveguides on a silicon chip and carries out a version of the quantum calculation known as Shor's algorithm. The result is an important step towards making practical, real-world quantum computers.</p>
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Applications are invited for a Chair in Theoretical Quantum Optics / Quantum Information Science. The post is available from 1st January 2010 and is based in the Quantum Optics and Laser Science (QOLS) Group of the Department of Physics.

New results in quantum cryptography show that the original protocol based on Bell's inequality is so powerful that it extends beyond the quantum realm. In the recent issue of Physics World Artur Ekert traces it all back to Einstein's considerations about physical reality.

Post-Doctoral fellowships at the Institute for Quantum Computing

The Institute for Quantum Computing is inviting applications for postdoctoral positions in all aspects of quantum information processing, bridging areas from fundamental theory to physical implementations.

Researchers in Austria, Germany and the US, proposed a scheme to couple the motion of a single atom with a crystal membrane. This scheme could be used to observe quantum-mechanical effects on a larger scale than ever before.

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, CO, have demonstrated multiple computing operations on quantum bits--a crucial step toward building a practical quantum computer.

Professor (W2) in Theoretical Physics

The successful candidate is expected to do research in quantum information theory, the dynamics of large complex quantum systems, or the space-time aspects of quantum dynamics.

The position will be based at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, and is associated with the research cluster QUEST (Centre for Quantum Engineering and Space-Time Research).
Close collaboration with QUEST and with the quantum information group of R. F. Werner is expected.

Screening will begin on September 15th.

A PhD studentship in Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics/Semiconductor Optics is available in the School of Physics at Trinity College Dublin, in the area of many-body phenomena in coupled light-matter systems (such as quantum dots and semiconductor microcavities). The project will explore many-particle effects in decoherence, using radiatively coupled quantum dots as a model system.

Precise control of quantum effects is vital to the realization of entirely new technologies. For example, a computer based on quantum physical principles is expected to outperform today's classical computers. In communication technology, quantum devices are already commercially available which allow secure transmission of data. Controlling the properties of photons down to the quantum level is at the heart of these technologies. In recent years, scientists in the group of Prof.