Edwin Cartlidge at PhysicsWorld writes: ''Physicists in the US have carried out an extremely precise test of the one of the cornerstones of modern physics – the idea that the two types of fundamental particle, bosons and fermions, follow two distinct kinds of statistical behaviour.

Dates: 
Saturday, October 2, 2010

The SFB TRR21 ("Control of Quantum Correlations in Tailored Matter"), located in Stuttgart, Ulm and Tübingen, invites all interested parties to attend its 3rd annual summer school in Blaubeuren from the 3rd to the 5th of october. Topics this year are "quantum effects in biology", "quantum tomography and sensing" and "hybrid quantum systems".

Please distribute/display the attached invitation/announcement to all possibly interested people in your departments.

According to a new Eurobarometer survey, almost 80% of Europeans are interested in science and technological developments, and just 65% claim to be interested in sports news. ''Perhaps a World Cup of science would get even more people round the TV than the football one does!'' quipped the European Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, Máire Geoghegan-Quinn, presenting the results of the survey. To download the full report as well as national factsheets, please visit:

Everyone working on quantum information theory has his or her favourite interpretation of quantum mechanics. Those interested in the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics will find an interesting presentation of philosophical controversies concerning quantum mechanics in the recent book "Quantum" by Manjit Kumar. Graham Farmelo, the author of “The Strangest Man,” a biography of Paul Dirac, in his review written for New York Times writes: ''[..] Manjit Kumar cites a poll about the interpretation of quantum mechanics, taken among physicists at a conference in 1999.

David Voss at APS Physics writes: ''Nonlocality—the entanglement of one object with another at a distance—is a powerful way to achieve quantum information processing. However, quantum mechanics is tethered by a “no-signaling” principle, that is, these correlations cannot be used to transmit information arbitrarily quickly from one point to another.