Researchers at the University of Vienna in Austria and the Technische Universität München in Germany have reported their findings, which will solve a long-standing problem in the design of micro- and nanoelectromechanical resonators, in the journal Nature Communications. The research team developed a finite-element-based numerical solver capable of predicting the design-limited damping of almost arbitrary mechanical resonators to resolve this problem.

The 2011 QIPC Young Investigator Award will be presented to an outstanding young researcher in the field of Quantum Information Processing and Communication during the QIPC international conference at ETH Zürich, September 5-9, 2011.

The award consists of a diploma and a lump sum of 4000€.

The award will be given to a researcher under the age of 35 for the best research recently published or presented at a major conference. Eligible researchers must be less than 35 years old on the 1st of September 2011.

Dates: 
Thursday, July 14, 2011
Submission deadline: 
Thursday, May 19, 2011

The aim of this workshop is to explore the connections between traditional TARK topics and Quantum Physics. While TARK traditionally focuses on the theoretical aspects of rationality and knowledge, quantum mechanics and quantum computation focus on the fundamental link between physical reality and informational (knowledge-acquiring) actions, such as observations and measurements. We think one can gain new insights from combining methods and concepts coming from these two lines of research.

Dates: 
Sunday, August 7, 2011
Submission deadline: 
Thursday, May 19, 2011

Future developments in the field of Quantum Computing and Quantum control are eagerly anticipated and include the discovery of new algorithms which could efficiently employ quantum computers, especially the relatively small size devices available today and in the near future; the development of improved threshold theorems to determine the requirements for scalable quantum computing; security proofs for a number of the alternate proposals for secure quantum communications; further elucidation of the various measures of entanglement, their relationship, and how they can be efficiently extract

The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman, who imagined a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems—a task that is believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a machine could have far-reaching applications in the simulation of many-body quantum physics in condensed-matter, chemical and high-energy systems.
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