The AtomChip Lab (www.bgu.ac.il/atomchip) at Ben-Gurion University (BGU) is searching for high quality candidates in a variety of fields, including, research into chip fabrication for quantum optics chips with atoms, ions and photons, fundamental research into atom optics with cold atoms, and applicative research which we are conducting in collaboration with the high-tech industry into atomic clocks and magnetic sensors with both hot and cold atoms. Our sub-group in theory also has open positions for qualified candidates.

Application deadline: 
Friday, December 10, 2010

James Dacey at PhysicsWorld writes: ''Just a small number of bad referees can significantly undermine the ability of the peer-review system to select the best scientific papers. That is according to a pair of complex systems researchers in Austria who have modelled an academic publishing system and showed that human foibles can have a dramatic effect on the quality of published science. <!--break-->Stefan Thurner and Rudolf Hanel at the Medical University of Vienna set out to make an assessment of how the peer-review system might respond to incompetent refereeing.

We are currently offering a postdoctoral position to highly motivated and well-qualified young researchers who intend to enhance their scientific career in the field of ultracold atoms - mixtures fermionic quantum gases. The position is associated with the research group of Prof. Jook Walraven at the Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute of the University of Amsterdam. The appointed candidates could start at their earliest convenience.

Application deadline: 
Thursday, December 30, 2010

Researchers describe how to carry out the first experimental test of string theory in a paper published tomorrow in Physical Review Letters.

String theory was originally developed to describe the fundamental particles and forces that make up our universe. The new research, led by a team from Imperial College London, describes the unexpected discovery that string theory also seems to predict the behaviour of entangled quantum particles. As this prediction can be tested in the laboratory, researchers can now test string theory.

Zeeya Merali at Nature News writes: ''Quantum hackers have performed the first 'invisible' attack on two commercial quantum cryptographic systems. By using lasers on the systems — which use quantum states of light to encrypt information for transmission — they have fully cracked their encryption keys, yet left no trace of the hack.