ArXiv identifier: 
0901.4470
Speakers: 
Susana F. Huelga
Authors: 
Neil P. Oxtoby, Ángel Rivas, Susana F. Huelga, and Rosario Fazio

We consider non-interacting multi-qubit systems as controllable probes of an environment of defects/impurities modelled as a composite spin-boson environment. The spin-boson environment consists of a small number of quantum-coherent two-level fluctuators (TLFs) damped by independent bosonic baths. A master equation of the Lindblad form is derived for the probe-plus-TLF system.

ArXiv identifier: 
0812.4305
Speakers: 
R. F. Werner
Authors: 
V. B. Scholz and R. F. Werner

The situation of two independent observers conducting measurements on a joint quantum system is usually modelled using a Hilbert space of tensor product form, each factor associated to one observer. Correspondingly, the operators describing the observables are then acting non-trivially only on one of the tensor factors. However, the same situation can also be modelled by just using one joint Hilbert space, and requiring that all operators associated to different observers commute, i.e. are jointly measurable without causing disturbance.

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have proved, for the first time, that the lifetime of quantum-computing bits can be extended. In their experiment, they showed that by applying specially timed magnetic pulses to qubits, made of beryllium ions, they could prolong the life of the quantum bits from about one millisecond to hundreds of milliseconds. The work is described in this week's Nature.

The realization of a universal quantum computer that can carry out arbitrary computations remains a long term goal. But the technologies developed so far enable us to perform so called quantum simulations. Here assemblies of directly controllable quantum particles form models for complex systems which are difficult to manipulate. A new, promising technique was now developed in the group of Professor Gerhard Rempe at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching.

FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY
CHAIR IN QUANTUM INFORMATION SCIENCE