In our new group at the University of Siegen (Germany) we are looking for a motivated
PhD student in the field of quantum information theory. The research topics include:

* theory of multiparticle entanglement,
* entanglement measures,
* foundations of quantum mechanics, e.g. the Kochen-Specker theorem

Applicants are expected to have a master / diploma in physics, experience in theoretical
physics and interest in foundational questions of quantum mechanics.

Application deadline: 
Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Michael Banks writes at Physics World: ''The US is no longer a "colossus of science" according to a new report looking into the country’s scientific output. Written by information-services provider Thomson Reuters, it says that although the US still holds a "commanding" lead in terms of its research impact, its forerunner status is being eroded. The report blames this on a rapid rise in scientific publishing from countries in Asia and Europe.''
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Dr. Olivia Meyer-Streng at IDW writes: ''The ability to control the propagation of light is at the technological heart of today’s telecommunication society. Researchers in the Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurement led by Prof. Tobias J. Kippenberg (now EPFL) have discovered a novel principle to accomplish this, which is based on the interaction of light (photons) with mechanical vibrations (phonons).

A PhD position is open in the atom optics group in Hamburg, Germany for studying the interaction of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical high finesse (> 500.000) cavity operating in the regime of resolved recoil sidebands. See details on [http://photon.physnet.uni-hamburg.de/en/ilp/footer/news-detail/open-phd-... our group homepage]

Quantum communication networks are high on Europe's agenda, with particular focus being given to quantum memory or information storage. Meeting the challenge head on to make such information accessible to users is a team of scientists from Denmark who used two 'entangled' light beams to store quantum information. The research study, supported by the EU with a combined funding of almost EUR 16 million, is presented in the journal Nature Physics.