Recently, quantum computing has been heralded as the new cool kid on the block. The point of quantum computing is that, during a calculation, the bits (called qubits) that are being manipulated are never in a definite one or zero state. Instead, they can be thought of as being both a one and a zero simultaneously, which allows a quantum computer to explore many solutions at the same time. The upshot is that, for a limited set of problems, quantum computers may offer a substantial speed up over normal computers.

Researchers have succeeded in building diodes that manipulate heat, which paves the way for thermal transistors and logic. Lei Wang and Baowen Li describe the emerging field of “phononics”.

MagiQ Technologies, Inc., the quantum information processing (QIP) company announced success of their 3 year joint venture program. The Quantum Communications Victoria (QCV) joint venture has produced the world’s first commercial source of single photons (single particles of light), which are a crucial component of quantum communication systems. MagiQ will collaborate in development and will participate in the sales and marketing of these new products.

Imagine two of your friends tell you – independently - about an agreement for a next meeting. Each of them however mentions a different meeting point. How do you find out who is the liar? And how can you finally succeed to meet at least the honest one at the right time and place?

Forty years ago, mathematician Marek Kac asked the theoretical question, "Can one hear the shape of a drum?". Hari Manoharan from Stanford Physics Faculty investigated with his students the drum question in the quantum realm, where it could have an effect on real nano-electronic systems.