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FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES
SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY
CHAIR IN QUANTUM INFORMATION SCIENCE

The intrinsic rotation of electrons - the "spin" - remains unused by modern electronics. If use as an information carrier were possible, the processing power of electronic components would suddenly increase to a multiple of the present capacity. In cooperation with colleagues from Dortmund, St. Petersburg and Washington, Bochum physicists have now succeeded in aligning electron spin, bringing it to a controlled "waver" and reading it out. The electron spin can also be realigned as required at any time using optical pulses.

ArXiv identifier: 

0901.4454

Speakers: 

Martin Plenio

Authors: 

Filippo Caruso, Alex W. Chin, Animesh Datta, Susana F. Huelga, Martin B. Plenio

Transport of excitations through networked systems plays an important role in many areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. The uncontrollable interaction of the transmission network with a noisy environment is usually assumed to deteriorate its transport capacity, especially so when the system is fundamentally quantum mechanical. Here we identify key mechanisms through which dephasing noise, contrary to expectation, may actually aid transport through a dissipative network.

ArXiv identifier: 

0903.0612

Speakers: 

Daniel Burgarth

Authors: 

Daniel Burgarth, Koji Maruyama

Identifying the nature of interactions in a quantum system is essential in understanding any physical phenomena. Acquiring information on the Hamiltonian can be a tough challenge in many-body systems because it generally requires access to all parts of the system. We show that if the coupling topology is known, the Hamiltonian identification is indeed possible indirectly even though only a small gateway to the system is used. Surprisingly, even a degenerate Hamiltonian can be estimated by applying an extra field to the gateway.

ArXiv identifier: 

0807.2444

Speakers: 

Alvaro Feito Boirac

Authors: 

J.S. Lundeen, A. Feito, H. Coldenstrodt-Ronge, K.L. Pregnell, Ch. Silberhorn, T.C. Ralph, J. Eisert, M.B. Plenio, I.A. Walmsley

Measurement connects the world of quantum phenomena to the world of classical events. It plays both a passive role, observing quantum systems, and an active one, preparing quantum states and controlling them. Surprisingly - in the light of the central status of measurement in quantum mechanics - there is no general recipe for designing a detector that measures a given observable. Compounding this, the characterization of existing detectors is typically based on partial calibrations or elaborate models. Thus, experimental specification (i.e.

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