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How heavy or how big can an object be before losing its quantum properties and obeying to the laws of classical physics? This question drives many research groups all around the globe. Answers still remain to be given as currently there are no systems which allow observing the expected tiny signatures of quantum effects in macroscopic objects. The novel system developed in the MPG Junior Research Group “Laboratory of Photonics” led by Dr. Tobias Kippenberg could resolve this problem.

For years, physicists have been heralding the revolutionary potential of using quantum mechanics to build a new generation of supercomputers, unbreakable codes, and ultra-fast and secure communication networks. The brave new world of quantum technology may be a big step closer to reality thanks to a team of University of Calgary researchers that has come up with a unique new way of testing quantum devices to determine their function and accuracy.

Researchers at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a technique that could make quantum cryptography significantly cheaper to implement, moving it nearer to possible commercial acceptance.

IBM bets big on spintronics, new type of memory which it says will deliver terabyte MP3 players.

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Researchers in the UK have taken a small but important step towards the creation of practical quantum computers by creating the first logic gates on a silicon chip that can process individual photons. The chip, which measures several millimetres across, reproduces an earlier version of the gate that occupied several square metres of space on an optical bench.

A new study hints that black holes might not be as good at keeping secrets as researchers have long thought. Recently [http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~patrick/ Patrick Hayden] and [http://www.theory.caltech.edu/~preskill/ John Preskill] have reexamined the time it would take for information to potentially escape from inside a black hole.

Slashdot has an article about the withdrawal of an article by Jonathan Oppenheim and co-authors from Physical Review Letters because they had asked for a rights agreement compatible with GFDL which Quantiki uses for its content.

The Canadian Quantum Information Summer School has become an annual Canadian tradition and welcomes students from all over the world. The Eighth installment aims to introduce the participants to quantum algorithms, quantum error correction, quantum information theory and quantum cryptography. They will also receive lectures on implementations, quantum complexity theory, nonlocality and some more recent developments in quantum algorithms, namely quantum walks.

The Summer School is being held at the Université de Montréal in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from June 9 to 13, 2008.

One of the problems plaguing classical communication is associated with what is known as the Byzantine agreement. In this problem, messages between three different parties are subject to faulty information. Quantum communication, though, has held the promise of solving this dilemma. But until now, it has been difficult to do so, even using entangled states.