News

Two years ago researchers at Duke University in the US unveiled the first “invisibility cloak” — a device that can make objects vanish from sight, at least when viewed using a narrow band of microwave frequencies. Now, Ulf Leonhardt of St Andrew’s University in the UK and Tomás Tyc of Masaryk University in the Czech Republic have come up with a new way of using mathematics to describe a invisibility cloak (Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1166332).

The entanglement of quantum bits (or qubits) is what should allow quantum computers to perform certain calculations much faster than the computers we use today. But now, physicists in Germany and Canada are saying that most qubits could be “too entangled” to be of any use in quantum computers.

On his blog Bruce Schneier writes "I'm always in favor of security research, and I have enjoyed following the developments in quantum cryptography. But as a product, it has no future. It's not that quantum cryptography might be insecure; it's that cryptography is already sufficiently secure."

Researchers in China and Europe have entangled a record-breaking 10 quantum bits — an important breakthrough in the quest to develop practical quantum computers.

Atoms have been combined for the first time into tightly bound molecules in large numbers at temperatures close to absolute zero.
This is good news for scientists who hope to have greater control over basic chemical reactions and for those who want to build a new
kind of computer, one based on mysterious quantum behavior.

How heavy or how big can an object be before losing its quantum properties and obeying to the laws of classical physics? This question drives many research groups all around the globe. Answers still remain to be given as currently there are no systems which allow observing the expected tiny signatures of quantum effects in macroscopic objects. The novel system developed in the MPG Junior Research Group “Laboratory of Photonics” led by Dr. Tobias Kippenberg could resolve this problem.

For years, physicists have been heralding the revolutionary potential of using quantum mechanics to build a new generation of supercomputers, unbreakable codes, and ultra-fast and secure communication networks. The brave new world of quantum technology may be a big step closer to reality thanks to a team of University of Calgary researchers that has come up with a unique new way of testing quantum devices to determine their function and accuracy.

Researchers at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a technique that could make quantum cryptography significantly cheaper to implement, moving it nearer to possible commercial acceptance.

IBM bets big on spintronics, new type of memory which it says will deliver terabyte MP3 players.

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SOMERVILLE, MA–April 7th, 2008 – MagiQ Technologies, Inc., the quantum